Neon, A Literary Magazine, Reviews BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA

Says reviewer Christopher Frost:

I was initially sceptical of Bibliotheca Fantastica, the recent anthology of short stories published by Dagan Books. The collection is, to put it simply, a book about books. Each of the twenty stories to be found between its covers involves a book, tome, scripture, scroll or tablet of some kind.

Don Pizarro’s introduction does a good job of touching on some of the reasons why books are such a potentially interesting subject – yet it still left me the tiniest bit unconvinced that it would be anything but a dry and interminable read. Thankfully this was not the case. The stories ranged widely, and included some stunningly original takes on the concept of a book.

In fact each story was so wildly unique and intriguing….

Read the rest here.

Find the post on their Facebook page and “like” or tweet it to be entered for a chance to win an ebook of Bibliotheca Fantastica.

The Qwillery ask BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA authors about the power of books

When we put together the fantasist anthology, Bibliotheca Fantastica, we asked ourselves, “What’s so magical about books, anyway?” David Sklar, Gord Sellar, Michael J. DeLuca, A.C. Wise,  Garry Kilworth, S.J. Hirons, Ray Vukcevich, Tina Connolly, and Andrew S. Fuller, answered that question for us, over at The Qwillery:

Books are time travel. They’re telepathy. They’re the seance, the ansible, the summoning ritual, the oracle, the visionary dream. Reading makes another person’s ideas our own, for better or worse, as different, far away or long ago as that other person might be. The connection isn’t perfect–what magic is? But what’s lost in the translation from one mind to the page and back into another’s leaves room for the creativity that makes the next book possible, and the next. If only we could read them all. – Michael J. DeLuca, author of “Other Palimpsests”

My favorite and most heartbreaking dreams are the ones where I’m in a library or old junk shop and I stumble on a book by a beloved author that I didn’t know existed. I know where this comes from–when I was little I was obsessed with the Wizard of Oz. I thought there was only one book, but then in my Scholastic flyer from school I boggled as I saw an advertisement for #2. In our local bookstore sometime later I found 3, and eventually all the L. Frank Baum ones through 14. Several years later I was in the Topeka library and the same thrilling shock ran through me as I found the ones by Ruth Plumly Thompson. Each of these moments is incised in my memory. The books themselves were magical, but the unexpected discovery that you could, in fact, go back to Oz (or Narnia, or Green Gables, or or or) was always the real magic. – Tina Connolly, author of “Paperheart”

We are matter that looks at and thinks about the universe and then tells stories. How that all works and why we should make up stories are deep mysteries, but that’s what we do, and while it might not really be magic, it is wonderful. As we change in the coming ages, if we survive, the way we tell those stories might change, too. When we augment those most complicated of things, our brains, new art forms will probably arise. At some deep level, though, I think it will still be narrative, because that’s who we are. We struggle to make sense of things and then we say stuff. Some of the most interesting things we say are collected in objects called “books.” – Ray Vukcevich, author of “The Go-Between”

Read the rest here.

New review of BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA now up at SF Signal

Says SF Signal:

Each story offers its own interpretation of the central theme; subtle work as well as more head-on approaches are represented; imagination and creative freedom are king.

Rated 4.5 of 5 stars!

Of special note were stories by Garry Kilworth, Lydia S. Gray, A.C. Wise, Colleen Anderson, J.S. Bangs, Michael Skeet, Tina Connolly, Andrew S. Fuller, Megan Arkenberg, David Sklar, and Ray Vukcevich. The reviewer’s favorite was Todd T. Castillo’s “Where Love is Written”, about which he says:

It’s a stripped-down, but heartfelt tale and its the emotional honesty that hits very hard. Often the simplest things cause the most astonishment.

and in conclusion, says about the book:

All in all, even the most fanatic of bibliophiles will suffer an overdose in the most positive connotation of the word. In the end, that’s what you need to understand about Bibliotheca Fantastica.

Read the rest of the review here.

Want to read Bibliotheca Fantastica now? Our ebooks offer instant download and an immediate chance to read.

Buy the epub file here, mobi (which also works on your Kindle) here, or PDF here, for only $4.99 each. Always DRM-free! Or you can buy a bundle of Bibliotheca Fantastica in all three digital formats, for only $6.99 (here)

Haven’t read FISH yet? Buy FISH and Bibliotheca Fantastica in a bundle together for $8.98… less than the cost of buying them separately.  Epub or mobi.

If you buy your ebooks exclusively through Amazon, then please go here to purchase a copy of Bibliotheca Fantastica for only $4.99.

Barnes and Noble has it here, and Kobo has it here (both as an epub for their readers). Weightless also offers the DRM-free epub or mobi here.

However you buy it, Bibliotheca Fantastica is a

guaranteed treat for the readers who are infatuated with books as physical objects as the stories help you rediscover why you fell in love with the written word and the act of reading in the first place.

Just ask SF Signal.

Interview: Andrew S. Fuller (FISH)

fuller

Name: Andrew S. Fuller

Age: 41

Author of: “A Salmon Tale, 2072”

Current Geographic Location: Portland, Oregon

Original Hometown, if different: Lincoln, Nebraska

Twitter: @andrewsfuller

Website: www.andrewsfuller.com

Recent publications: “One Childhood of Many” published in May 2012 by Daily Science Fiction; “Block Party” published in March 2012 by On Spec Magazine #87 vol 23 no 4; “Ina’s Day” published in Sept 2011 by Space Tramps: Full-Throttle Space Tales #5 anthology (Flying Pen Press); “Occupations” published Jan 2011 by Crossed Genres #26.

Which zodiac sign where you born under? Western: Aquarius; Chinese: year-Yen Metal Pig/Boar, month-Metal Ox, day-Water Ox, hour-Metal Monkey

If a magic fish granted you one wish, what would it be? To hold my breath for 30 min underwater. Or to remember the text of the fictional books that I sometimes glimpse in my dreams.

What inspired your story? The story and history of traditional fishing sites along the Columbia River like Ceilio Falls and Kettle Falls where indigenous tribes gathered for 10,000 years that are now completely submerged by big dams in the contemporary world. Salmon are an amazing species who represent cultural and environmental change, their dwindling numbers is akin to the downfall of the bison herds in 19th century.

Did you listen to music while writing it? Rarely do while writing, sometimes classical music while sketching. I was privileged to visit a salmon ceremony last fall and hear native drumming.

How many rewrites did you do before submitting? Somewhere between 5.5 and 7.25 times.

What is your favorite bit?

I am still learning my wife’s language. My son speaks both. My grandson less of mine. His children will not need my old words. But theirs are older.

Want to read the rest? Get the ePub (for nook and other readers) here and mobi (perfect for your Kindle) here. Only $4.99 each, instant downloads.

You can also get FISH as an ebook through Barnes & NobleAmazon, or Kobo.

Official Table of Contents for FISH

Table of Contents, FISH (due out February 8, 2012)

  1. Alexa, Camille “The Skin of Her Skin”
  2. Bennardo, Matthew “The Fish-Wife’s Tale”
  3. Blake, Polenth “Thwarting the Fiends”
  4. Darrach, Shay “I Know a Secret”
  5. Davis, Amanda C. “O How the Wet Folk Sing”
  6. Dixon, Paul A. “One Let Go”
  7. Duyvis, Corinne “The Applause of Others”
  8. Englehardt, Megan “Anansi and the New Thing”
  9. Fleming, Sam “What the Water Gave Her”
  10. Fuller, Andrew “A Salmon Tale, 2072”
  11. Fullerton, H.L. “The Fish Are There On Land”
  12. Gardner, Cate “Too Delicate for Human Form”
  13. George, Zachary “You, Fish”
  14. Hendrix, Sarah “Never to Return”
  15. Kane, Tim “Vanity Mirror”
  16. Kneeland, Andrea “Becoming Human”
  17. Kwak, Jessie “Needlepoint Fish of Azure City”
  18. L’Orange, April “Quick Karma”
  19. Lalumière, Claude “Xandra’s Brine”
  20. Liu, Ken “How Do You Know If a Fish Is Happy?”
  21. McBride, Tracie “The Touch of Taniwha”
  22. McIntyre, T.J. “How Did the Catfish Get a Flat Head, You Wonder?”
  23. Nakayama, Timothy “Fallen Dragon”
  24. Obedoza, Mel “The Fisherman and Golden Fish”
  25. Palmer, Suzanne “Lanternfish In the Overworld”
  26. Povey, Jennifer R. “Water Demons”
  27. Rambo, Cat “The Fisher Queen”
  28. Romasco-Moore, Maria “Fisheye”
  29. Ruby, Jacob “The Talking Fish of Shangri-La”
  30. Shvartsman, Alex “Life at the Lake’s Shore”
  31. Spencer, A. D. “Fish Tears”
  32. Wood, Mjke “The Last Fisherman of Habitat 37”
  33. Zup, Andreea “Maria and the Fish”

Please note the Table of Contents is currently listed alphabetically by author’s last name, and does not reflect the final order of stories.