Neon, A Literary Magazine, Reviews BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA

Says reviewer Christopher Frost:

I was initially sceptical of Bibliotheca Fantastica, the recent anthology of short stories published by Dagan Books. The collection is, to put it simply, a book about books. Each of the twenty stories to be found between its covers involves a book, tome, scripture, scroll or tablet of some kind.

Don Pizarro’s introduction does a good job of touching on some of the reasons why books are such a potentially interesting subject – yet it still left me the tiniest bit unconvinced that it would be anything but a dry and interminable read. Thankfully this was not the case. The stories ranged widely, and included some stunningly original takes on the concept of a book.

In fact each story was so wildly unique and intriguing….

Read the rest here.

Find the post on their Facebook page and “like” or tweet it to be entered for a chance to win an ebook of Bibliotheca Fantastica.

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SF Signal interviews Don Pizarro about BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA

SF Signal introduces their new interview with author and editor Don Pizarro by calling our latest anthology “the excellent Bibliotheca Fantastica (see their review). With questions that range from the concept of books as an idea to the thrills and dangers of the book-worlds our authors created, the interview explores a little bit of what an editor thinks after the book is put together…

HM: As I read the stories, I could sense an unwritten warning about the power of books. When it comes to books with magical properties, what’s more dangerous – the book or the reader?

DP: That’s a false dichotomy I think, and here’s why. Think about the phrase, “Guns don’t kill people….” There are three ways to finish it: (a) “people do,” (b) “bullets do,” or (c) “Actually no, guns do kill people.” However you answer it, if you take away any one of those elements (Let’s swap: (a) the reader, (b) the book’s content, (c) the book-as-object), there just isn’t as much danger as there is when all the elements are combined.

Combine them, and the danger is practically limitless!

Read the rest here.

New review of BIBLIOTHECA FANTASTICA now up at SF Signal

Says SF Signal:

Each story offers its own interpretation of the central theme; subtle work as well as more head-on approaches are represented; imagination and creative freedom are king.

Rated 4.5 of 5 stars!

Of special note were stories by Garry Kilworth, Lydia S. Gray, A.C. Wise, Colleen Anderson, J.S. Bangs, Michael Skeet, Tina Connolly, Andrew S. Fuller, Megan Arkenberg, David Sklar, and Ray Vukcevich. The reviewer’s favorite was Todd T. Castillo’s “Where Love is Written”, about which he says:

It’s a stripped-down, but heartfelt tale and its the emotional honesty that hits very hard. Often the simplest things cause the most astonishment.

and in conclusion, says about the book:

All in all, even the most fanatic of bibliophiles will suffer an overdose in the most positive connotation of the word. In the end, that’s what you need to understand about Bibliotheca Fantastica.

Read the rest of the review here.

Want to read Bibliotheca Fantastica now? Our ebooks offer instant download and an immediate chance to read.

Buy the epub file here, mobi (which also works on your Kindle) here, or PDF here, for only $4.99 each. Always DRM-free! Or you can buy a bundle of Bibliotheca Fantastica in all three digital formats, for only $6.99 (here)

Haven’t read FISH yet? Buy FISH and Bibliotheca Fantastica in a bundle together for $8.98… less than the cost of buying them separately.  Epub or mobi.

If you buy your ebooks exclusively through Amazon, then please go here to purchase a copy of Bibliotheca Fantastica for only $4.99.

Barnes and Noble has it here, and Kobo has it here (both as an epub for their readers). Weightless also offers the DRM-free epub or mobi here.

However you buy it, Bibliotheca Fantastica is a

guaranteed treat for the readers who are infatuated with books as physical objects as the stories help you rediscover why you fell in love with the written word and the act of reading in the first place.

Just ask SF Signal.